Global Village Academic Course

Overview

Students in the Global Village are expected to take an internationally themed course during their tenure in the Learning & Living Community. This course has traditionally focused on global issues and how they can be addressed in an ever increasingly connected world.

Course Description

INS 130 Global Village Living and Learning Community (1.5 hr)

This course is designed to create discussion on issues of global citizenship for the Global Village Learning and Living Community. Students are exposed to a variety of ways to view global citizenship through a series of global competencies. This class is designed to be taken twice, once in the Fall semester and once in Spring semester for Global Village residents.

Program History

  • 2018 - 2019: LLC Year 2

    Fall: Dr. Omaar Hena, English Department

    This class will explore debates over free speech over the past century. We will begin by examining some foundational texts on free speech, especially as they impact oppressed and marginalized groups including members of the lower classes, racial minorities, women, and sexual minorities. After establishing this critical foundation, we will then examine contemporary debates over free speech and dissent on college campuses. For instance, we will read Stanley Fish’s arguments against free speech; debates over hate speech and race in Henry Louis Gates, Robert Post, and Bhikhu Parekh; and on-going debates over whether universities “coddle students” (as Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt claim) or whether campus protests are the means for students to claim agency and articulate themselves as “the new intellectuals” (as Walt Hunter argues in The Atlantic Monthly).

    Spring: Dr. Beth Ann Way, Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies

    Works of testimony and witness are key to giving a voice to those we may not hear on a daily basis due to geographic, socioeconomic, linguistic, racial, and national divides. Yet, these are some of the most important ways of voicing how someone experiences and understands global citizenship. We also get to hear from those where their citizenship is denied, unacknowledged, or not wanted. Testimonials can be delivered in a variety of forms; memoirs, documentaries, literature, film, and visual art all stand to teach us something about the speaker’s world and most importantly in his or her own words or images. In this course we shall specifically analyze the intersections of gender, class, race and nationality to understand what global citizenship means to a variety of writers and artists around the world. Texts— whether visual, aural, or printed—all have a unique rationale for voicing their ideas and speaking to a specific audience. Through discussion, debate, writing, and creative projects, students will be exposed to a variety of ways to view global citizenship through five global competencies – expression, engagement, discourse, inquiry, and connections.

  • 2017 - 2018: LLC Year 1

    Fall: Dr. Alessandra Von Burg, Department of Communication, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    The purpose of this course is to explore the history and theory of citizenship as a participatory and deliberative global practice. We focus on the role of discourse, invention, and imagination in the making of permanent citizens, long-term residents, newcomers, and our role as temporary citizens, along with the norms and rules that make each of these roles unique.

    The course emphasizes participatory and deliberative skills as part of the process in which communities are formed and citizens emerge as members, stressing unconventional examples of citizens who exist or struggle in unexplored geographical and metaphysical spaces, like beyond and in between Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, and the surrounding region, the United States as a nation, and the larger global context. Examples may include discourses around what we may consider ideal citizens locally, nationally, and globally; instances of creative and engaged citizenship; traditional and unconventional ways to bring about change; and unique contributions to Wake and the local, national, and global community.

    Spring: Professor Barbara Lentz, School of Law

    We seek to increase knowledge and capacity for intercultural communication and inquiry, community interaction, and global responsibility by studying humanitarian aid and nongovernmental responses to international disasters. Our work is designed to help students: interpret global events from multiple perspectives; discover and explain how their assumptions influence their understanding; and formulate solutions to global challenges. Course work will encourage each student to reflect on how the student will respond the next time there is a disaster by applying lessons learned to future relief and humanitarian aid, and also to develop the student’s: awareness of our own and other’s ways of making meaning; ability to manage emotions and thoughts; and capacity to bridge cultural gaps in our residential, campus, local, and global communities.

  • 2016 - 2017: Living & Learning Community (LLC) Pilot Program

    Lead Faculty

    Dr. Kline Harrison, Associate Provost for Global Affairs and Kemper Professor of Business

    Description

    This course is meant to analyze and explore global perspectives. The audience of this class is the Global Village Learning and Living community of Spring 2017. The purpose is to expose students to a variety of ways to view global citizenship. Three primary questions motive this class (How do I know? Who am I? and How do I relate to others?). In order to answer these questions, three domains, Cognitive, Intrapersonal, and Interpersonal, have been identified as lenses to understanding global perspectives. Within each domain are two core competencies (Cognitive: knowing and knowledge, Intrapersonal: identity and affect, and Interpersonal: social responsibility and social interactions). Each competency will be explored through two week modules conducted by professors across disciplines. After completing this course, students should be able to understand, articulate, and engage with the pluralistic development of our society.

    Guest Faculty: Fall

    Dr. Alessandra Von Burg, Department of Communication, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures

    Dr. Steve Folmar, Department of Anthropology

    Dr. Rebecca Thomas, Department of German & Russian

    Dr. Lisa Kiang, Department of Psychology

    Guest Faculty: Spring

    Dr. Ron Von Burg, Department Commmunication

    Dr. Ana Iltis, Department of Philosophy

    Dr. Tanaisha Ramachandran, Department for the Study of Religions

  • 2015 - 2016: Theme Program

    Lead Faculty

    Dr. Kline Harrison, Associate Provost for Global Affairs and Kemper Professor of Business

    Description

    This course is designed to create discussion on issues of global citizenship for the Global Village Learning and Living community. The purpose is to expose students to a variety of ways to view global citizenship. Five global competencies (Expression, Engagement, Discourse, Inquiry, and Connections) have been identified as lenses to understanding global citizenship. Each competency is explored through two week lecture series which are conducted by professors across disciplines. This class is designed to be taken twice, once in the Fall semester and once in Spring semester, by all members of the Global Village LLC. After completing this course, students should be able to understand, articulate, and engage in the many facets of global citizenship.

    Fall: Guest Faculty

    Dr. Tanaisha Ramachandran, Department of the Study of Religions

    Dr. Mary Gerardy, Pro Humanitate Institute

    Dr. Alessandra Von Burg, Department of Communication, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures

    Dr. John Dalton, Department of Economics

    Spring: Guest Faculty

    Dr. Paul Thacker, Department of Anthropology

    Dr. Ian Taplin, Department of Sociology

    Dr. Simon Illesami, Department of the Study of Religions

    Dr. Ron Von Burg, Department of Communication

    Dr. Helga Welsh, Department of Political Science