October 21-27, 2018

October 21-27, 2018

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION WEEK

International Education Week (IEW) is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of internationalization on campuses across the U.S. International Education Week serves as a reminder that college and university campuses play a special part in shaping the awareness of our role in the global village. Wake Forest University faculty, staff, and students are encouraged to explore the value of education abroad, the richness that is brought into our classrooms and departments by international faculty, staff and students, and the benefits derived from all international programs on campus.

Sponsored by Center for Global Programs and Studies, Intercultural Center, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, East Asian Languages, and Campus Recreation


Dr. Alaa Murabit

International Education Week, Keynote Speaker

10/25 – 7 pm – Pugh Auditorium

Dr. Alaa Murabit is a physician, one of 17 Global Sustainable Development Goal Advocates appointed by the UN Secretary General, and the youngest UN High-Level Commissioner on Health Employment & Economic Growth. Most recently appointed the Executive Director of inclusive security firm Phase Minus 1, Alaa became one of the youngest recipients of both the Canadian Meritorious Service Cross and the Nelson Mandela International Change-maker award, from the Mandela Family in 2018.

Murabit’s TED Talk, released in July 2015, “What my religion really says about women” was selected as the TED Talk of the Day and one of four moving TED Talks you should watch right now by The New York Times. The founder of a global mentorship programme for emerging leaders and co-founder of The Omnis Institute, an organization committed to challenging critical global issues through the empowerment of emerging local leaders, Alaa champions women’s participation in peace processes and conflict mediation. At 21 Alaa founded The Voice of Libyan Women to improve the political participation and the economic empowerment of women in Libya. She has been recognized as the International TrustWoman Hero by the New York Times, a Forbes 30 Under 30, Canadian 30×30, and a the youngest Harvard Law Woman Inspiring Change.

Alaa views challenges through a unique lens; she’s lived between dictatorship and conflict, and has shaped national and global security, health, education and economic policies which impact billions. She serves as a trustee for The Malala Fund, International Alert, Malaria No More and Women’s March Global, and is a respected thought leader on how female empowerment and inclusion lies at the heart of the solutions for a sustainable and prosperous world.


  • SUNDAY EVENTS 10/21/2018

    Launch

    10:30am-1:30pm
    Magnolia Room – Reynolda Hall
    Register in Handshake ( for Freshmen & Sophomore International Students only) 

    • Interactive presentation to identify your skills and interests and how to use this information to choose a major
    • Advice from upperclassmen international students on making the most of your Wake Forest experience
    • Learn basic dining etiquette knowledge.
    *This event includes lunch.
    Co-presented by International Student and Scholar Services, the School of Business, and the Office of Personal and Career Development

  • MONDAY EVENTS 10/22/2018
    Ms. Okwui Okpokwasili’s ‘Bronx Gothic’ 
    10-11:45 am and 7-9 pm
    Scales Art Room 102

    Join the WFU Department of Theatre and Dance for one of two screenings of Bronx Gothic, a film portrait of writer and performer Okwui Okpokw. It provides a space for audiences to engage with the “political terrain” of her “brown body.” Although the play within the play of Bronx Gothic is set in the 1980s, Okwui’s piece is timely. She explains in the film that her depiction of a “vibrating brown body” is political insofar as all “black and brown bodies” have been inscribed with a history of violence in our culture. She says in the film that Americans have become “acculturated to seeing brown bodies in pain,” and she hopes that “Bronx Gothic” will allow audience members to grow their “empathic capacity” while seeing her in a radical dance that presents the brown body from a new perspective.

    International Food in the Pit
    Stop by the international station at the Pit to try something new!
    Poverty, Inc.
    Movie Screening
    3:30 – 5:30 pm
    ZSR 404
    From social entrepreneurship to foreign aid, the documentary POVERTY, INC. examines the rise of charity as a multibillion dollar poverty industry. After the screening, several students from the Community Based Global Learning program will share their experiences in Thailand.
    Japanese Conversation Table
    4:30-5:30 pm
    Carswell Hall Ground Floor Lobby
    Join the community of Japanese language learners to practice speaking in Japanese and make new friends!
  • TUESDAY EVENTS 10/23/2018

    Chinese Experience Panel 

    BENS 215 Pugh Auditorium

    9:00 am – 10:00 am

    A panel for WFU campus community about the Chinese Experiences at WFU.

    International Food in the Pit
    Stop by the international station at the Pit to try something new!

    International Tea Time

    Reynolda 122

    12:30-1:30 pm

    The Counseling Center will be hosting an international tea time for students.

    Chinese Conversation Table

    4:00 – 4:45 pm
    Carswell 014
    Fun Chinese Activities

    This Table will focus on providing Chinese second language learners a place to practice Chinese language skills. Mandarin is used as the main language for the interested in are who Chinese international students Chinese Conversation Tables. particularly encouraged and welcome to teaching Chinese as a second language are join us.

    International Dunhuang Project

    5:30pm to 7:00pm

     ZSR, 404

    Dr. Susan Whitfield, former director of the International Dunhuang Project and lead curator of Central Asian manuscripts at the British Library, discusses the collaborative effort to conserve, catalogue, and digitize manuscripts and artifacts from Dunhuang and other Silk Road sites.

  • WEDNESDAY EVENTS 10/24/2018

    Passports and Pizza

    11:30-12:30 pm

    The Intercultural Center (Benson 346)

    Come hear about the study abroad experiences from current and recent study abroad students of color over Free Pizza!

    International Food in the Pit
    Stop by the international station at the Pit to try something new!

    Project Pumpkin

    3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

    Hearn Plaza

    Visit the ISSS student table at Project Pumpkin!

    Silk, Slaves and Stupas: Material Culture along the Silk Road

    5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

    The Library Auditorium (ZSR Room 404)

    Susan Whitfield of the British Library

    I am a writer, traveller, scholar and lecturer of the Silk Road. Having worked for 25 years at the British Library directing the International Dunhuang Project (IDP) and curating a collection of over 50,000 Silk Road manuscript I have direct knowledge of much of the material and places fro the Silk Road.
    When I started out little was written about the Silk Road for a general audience and I enjoyed trying to understand everyday life of individuals as well as the complexities of the many interactions along these great trade routes of the past, hence my book ‘Life Along the Silk Road.’ My new book (‘Silk, Slaves and Stupas’), is a collection of biographies of favourite Silk Road objects that I have been lucky enough to work with over the past two decades. I am now working as editor on a new book celebrating the landscapes, peoples, cultures, technologies and arts of the Silk Road.

  • THURSDAY EVENTS 10/25/2018

    Intercultural Snacks 

    11:30 am

    The Intercultural Center (Benson 346)

    Stop by the IC and experience snacks from various cultures.

    International Food in the Pit
    Stop by the international station at the Pit to try something new!

    Lunch and Learn:  Hiring International Faculty and Staff

    12:00 pm-1:30 pm

    Register on the PDC website (For Faculty and Staff)

    Does your department hire international faculty and staff?  Are you a campus stakeholder that works with international employees?  If so, this lunch and learn is for you!  Please join the International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) for an overview on the steps involved in hiring international faculty and staff.

    Chris Cardona

    Regional Recruiter Peace Corps

    3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

    Reynolda 301

    Serving in the Peace Corps is a great way to immerse yourself in a new culture, learn a new language, and have the experience of a lifetime.

    Join us at this information session to:

    -Learn about Volunteer experiences

    -Ask questions about service

    -Gain tips to guide you through the application process.

    Bridges International: English Corner

    3:30-4:30 PM

    Reynolds Gym  – Room B274

    English Corner is a place to meet with native English speakers and practice your English skills.  Join me each Thursday for words, games, and opportunities to enhance your skills! Feel free to stop by and introduce yourself even if you cannot stay for the full hour.   No preparation is required.

    An Afternoon with Famed Writer Cristina García

    3:30 pm

    Greene Hall 317

    Author Cristina García will discuss her life and work in a visit with students and the general public.  In harmony with the community partnerships we have formed with SECCA, she will encourage students to be active citizens, to reflect on questions about borders, to reach out to immigrant communities, and to write about their experiences.  Presented by the Department of Italian & Spanish, and the Latin American & Latino Studies Program.

    Immigration on the Ballot 

    Deacs Decide Immigration Reform Dialogue

    6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

    Carswell Hall – 111 Annenberg Forum

    Pro Humanitate Institute

    Join us for a dialogue on immigration policy in the midterm elections.

    Conveners: Dr. Ana Wahe, Associate Professor, WFU Department of Sociology and Irving Zavaleta-Jimenez, MBA, Program Coordinator for Social Justice Education, PHI

    Dr. Alaa Murabit

    International Education Week Keynote Speaker

    7 pm

    Benson – Pugh Auditorium

    Dr. Alaa Murabit is a physician, one of 17 Global Sustainable Development Goal Advocates appointed by the UN Secretary General, and the youngest UN High-Level Commissioner on Health Employment & Economic Growth. Most recently appointed the Executive Director of inclusive security firm Phase Minus 1, Alaa became one of the youngest recipients of both the Canadian Meritorious Service Cross and the Nelson Mandela International Change-maker award, from the Mandela Family in 2018.

    Murabit’s TED Talk, released in July 2015, “What my religion really says about women” was selected as the TED Talk of the Day and one of four moving TED Talks you should watch right now by The New York Times. The founder of a global mentorship programme for emerging leaders and co-founder of The Omnis Institute, an organisation committed to challenging critical global issues through the empowerment of emerging local leaders, Alaa champions women’s participation in peace processes and conflict mediation. At 21 Alaa founded The Voice of Libyan Women to improve the political participation and the economic empowerment of women in Libya. She has been recognized as the International TrustWoman Hero by the New York Times, a Forbes 30 Under 30, Canadian 30×30, and a the youngest Harvard Law Woman Inspiring Change.

    Alaa views challenges through a unique lens; she’s lived between dictatorship and conflict, and has shaped national and global security, health, education and economic policies which impact billions. She serves as a trustee for The Malala Fund, International Alert, Malaria No More and Women’s March Global, and is a respected thought leader on how female empowerment and inclusion lies at the heart of the solutions for a sustainable and prosperous world.

  • FRIDAY EVENTS 10/26/2018

    Documentary Screening: Elián

    1:00 pm

    Benson 349

    The documentary shares the remarkable story of Elian Gonzalez, the 5-year-old Cuban boy found in the Florida Straits on Thanksgiving Day in 1999. After his mother and others perished at sea, the custody battle between Gonzalez’s Cuban father and Miami-based relatives sparked a flash point for simmering post-Cold War U.S. and Cuban tensions.

    Talk by Professor Jeff Persels, University of South Carolina: “Reducing French Classics for the Stage: Molière, Perrault, Voltaire”

    3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
    ZSR 404

    The Department of French Studies is pleased to present “Reducing French Classics for the Stage: Molière, Perrault, Voltaire,” a talk by Jeff Persels, Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina.

    This event is open to the public, and will be of interest to anyone interested in theater, literature, and language!

    Jeff Persels has been creating, adapting and staging French works for student production for over 20 years and directing and acting with a local French theatre troupe for over 10. He has also created, adapted and performed a number of French puppet shows for children. Texts and recordings available for free download and use via his website https://www.amateurfrenchtheatre

    Shabbat Dinner 
    6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
    Hillel Lounge
    All are welcome to the Shabbat weekly dinner, every Friday night!
  • SATURDAY EVENTS 10/27/2018

    Asian Field Day

    1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

    Davis Field

    Chinese Studies Club, Japanese Studies Club, Asian Student Interest Association and The Globe are coming together to present Asian Field Day. There will be fun Asian field games on Davis field such as three legged race, tear tag, and so much more – including Asian snacks! Anyone is welcome to join to build teams.

  • WEEK LONG EVENTS 10/22/2018-10/26/2018

    Museum of Anthropology

    Tuesday-Friday

    Faith: Five World Religions.
    Religion, belief, and faith are very personal and complex topics that affect the lives of people around the world and in North Carolina every day.  This new student-curated exhibit looks at five prominent religions from across the globe.  Using objects from the museum’s collections, photographs, audio, and loans from the local community, the exhibit focuses on Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, and Buddhism.  The exhibition discusses the history, variations, and beliefs of each of these religions through artifacts from a variety of cultures.

    ***Tuesday – Saturday, 10 am – 4:30 pm***

    観察 (Kansatsu) – Photography by Kayla Amador

    October 21-26

    Open Mon–Sat, 10 am–6 pm

    START Gallery
    122A Reynolda Village
    Winston-Salem, NC 27106

    “This exhibition consists of photographs I took during my semester abroad in Japan, from January to April 2018. Immersed in new surroundings, I spent my time learning, living and traveling in and beyond the metropolis of Tokyo. My purpose in studying abroad was to further my education in Japanese Language and Culture, and to take another stride towards fluency in the Japanese language. Hoping to be able to make the most of this opportunity, and wishing to artistically preserve my experience, I wouldn’t leave the dorm without my camera.

    The Japanese writing system consists of a combination of three scripts: two syllabic sets of characters called ひらがなHiragana and カタカナKatakana, and logographic Chinese characters adapted into Japanese called 漢字Kanji. Over the course of the semester, I found myself drawn to the visual presentations of language that I encountered day-to-day – combinations of these Japanese scripts, interacting with various spaces, and juxtaposed with other languages such as Chinese and English. These photographs are the result of my attempt to keep track of language as I encountered it in Japan, language that directs, demands, exhorts, prohibits, that produce unintended humor in translation, that advertises, that names important people and places, that references popular culture; some that I could not yet understand at the time, and some that I could. I would photograph these instances of encountering a collision of language, out of aesthetic interest, and as a way to learn how to read Japanese.

    観察 Kansatsu is a Japanese word that refers to the act of observation. There is perhaps an element of invasiveness to the idea of observation. Yet as artists, observation of different kinds should be fundamental to what we do, and it can lead from mere interest to empathy to understanding, as much as enable surveillance. I felt self-conscious, though I did not feel that I “fit-in” in Japan any more or less than I did in America, nor did I seek to. Thus I settled rather comfortably into this role of an observer, not able to completely assimilate or understand – but able to relate and interpret – many similarities and differences. I found great interest in the everyday use of written text and its function in society and felt it important to draw attention towards it in my work.

    In completing this exhibition, I would like to thank: my mother, younger sister, and grandparents; Professor Yasuko Takata-Rallings; friends whom I’ve made domestic and abroad; Paul Bright, Katie Wolf, Jay Buchanan, and the START Gallery, and visitors to this exhibition, for supporting me, my interests, and pursuits in art and language acquisition.” – Kayla Amador, 2018